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Time for a change: Get rid of one and done

Courtesy of Nike

If you are a diehard college basketball fan like I am, then there is no greater joy than this time of the year.   Also with this joy comes the agony of always hearing about who the experts feel are “one and dones.”



The subject of "one and dones" became a huge debate in 2005, when the NBA and its players (National Basketball Players Association) added an age limit.  Starting with the 2006 NBA draft, players will gain eligibility for draft selection one year after their high school graduation and they must also be at least 19 years old as of the end of the calendar year of the draft.



The age limit has no shortage of critics, and a number of potential options for changing the rule have been proposed. The most popular proposal seems to be a system patterned after Major League Baseball's amateur draft.  



After graduation high school baseball players can enter the MLB draft, but if they enter college, (unless a junior college) they become ineligible until after they have finished their junior or senior years or will turn 21 years old no later than 45 days after the draft.



I sort of like this rule because the purpose of it, is to allow elite high school players to turn pro immediately, while ensuring college teams have some measure of  cohesiveness with 3-year commitments. 



Now I am not insinuating that high school basketball players who decide to attend college should be committed to three years because I feel that a two year commitment would be suffice.



National Collegiate Players Association director Ramogi Huma, strongly believes that revenue athletes (football and basketball) should receive a portion of new revenues, like TV contracts, to be put in an “educational lockbox.’’ According to Huma, players could tap those funds to help cover educational costs if they exhaust their athletic eligibility before they graduate, or receive the money with no strings attached upon graduating.  He also propose that athletes be free to seek commercial deals, such as endorsements, with some of the money from that going to the lockbox, and the rest available for the athlete’s immediate use.



In a perfect world I would love to see all college athletes paid a monthly stipend for their participation in their respective sports but college football and basketball are the reasons for the big TV network payouts.



In my opinion, instead of getting what they’re worth, the players receive athletic scholarships that don’t cover the full cost of attending school.



I like a combination of the MLB amateur draft model and Ramogi Huma’s “educational lockbox.”



Players that choose to leave school early and have money in the lockbox would be able to receive based upon what was placed in the lockbox for them while in school.



My point is?  The longer a revenue athlete remains in school, then the more money they will receive upon graduation.



This doesn’t compare to the millions awaiting a Jabari Parker or Andrew Wiggins and others who could have gone from high school to the NBA, but it does give them as well as others an incentive to remain in school and graduate.



2 Comments to Time for a change: Get rid of one and done:

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Steve on Wednesday, October 30, 2013 10:45 AM
Right on point!! I am not convinced about the educational lockbox though but a stipend for all athletes.
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Sportsdiva on Wednesday, October 30, 2013 7:59 PM
I hate the one & done... I agree get rid of it!!
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